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20121204
20121204
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to work, does it? but in the clinton era when the rates went up, the 39.6 from 35 , they paid a little bit more and, guess what, the income boomed. we had 3.8% unploimed. we balanced the budget -- we had 3.8% unemployment. we balanced the budget. they opposed the tax increases in 4-. they said a disaster would result. not a single republican voted for the increases in taxes that president clinton put forward, which ultimately led to a balanced budget and paying down debt for the first time in 50 years. not one of them because they said it would bring economic disaster and instead is brought prosperity. so they brought out that old broken record, they glued it back together. maybe they put it on the -- put it in a digital format or something. but they're playing it again. it's as valid now as it was then. so it's the same old plan, stick it to the middle class, stick it to the seniors and benefit the ultrawealthy in this country. that's not a new plan. that's the same old broken record. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentleman from texas, mr. poe, for five minutes. mr. po
president clinton was in office, he left this country in the black. the people have weighed in. they've indicated that we want to move forward, we want to put people to work but we want to do it in a fair method of doing it. and that is not cutting programs that impacts the working poor in this country. mr. garamendi: well, you're absolutely correct about that. the proposal to cut medicare benefits is a nonstarter. there are things that can be done in medicare to reduce the costs and much has already been done. i'd like to ask my colleague from the great state of michigan to join us, mr. curson is a new member, came in during a special election. welcome. delighted to have you join us. mr. curson: thank you. i agree wholeheartedly with what's been said so far and the testimony, what i really want to say -- into the mic. what i really want to say is medicare is run more efficiently than nearly any insurance company in the world. they devote less than 2% of its funding to administrative expenses, and you compare that to a private insurance company that costs up to 40% of premiums for in
. >> mark zandi said returning to clinton-era tax rates would hurt the economy but is necessary to get the deficit under control. his comments came at a forum and also bush administration lawrence lindsay and clinton white house chief of staff. >> thank you so much and thank you chairman bachus for turning us and turn it over to peter cook who will moderate our tax panel on tax reform. >> i got a feeling you have to head back to the hill. we hope to come up with some answers and ideas from this panel. we have -- we'll write them down. i'll hand them to your staffer. you hear the mission. we have to come up with some ideas that can pass congress and meet with everyone's approval, so no small task. there are some new faces at the table and again, we want to welcome all of you and go around the table and introduce at least our new faces. we have got the brookings institution who has done a lot on fiscal issues. we have the lindsay group, former economic adviser to president bush. welcome. we have the chairman for the center of american progress. former chief of staff of bill clinton. john
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3